Here’s how gas pumps make ‘sagad’ your fuel tank without overflowing

‘Matic o sagad, sir?’
by Drei Laurel | Sep 20, 2022
Image of a gas station fuel pump
PHOTO: Steve Mould/YouTube

If you’ve never gassed up outside the Philippines, you might think that gas station attendants filling your tank up for you is the norm. Well, it’s not.

In other countries, motorists handle fuel pumps by themselves. They’re fully in control of how much fuel goes into their vehicle—or in the case of a full tank, kung sagad ang pag karga.

Never tried it? Don’t worry, it really doesn’t take much skill. Gas pumps have built-in safeguards that ensure that vehicles’ fuel tanks don’t overflow. If they didn’t? Let’s just say fires at fuel stations would be a much more common occurrence.

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So, how do gas pumps do it? Now you might think that some fancy electronics or sensors are in play. The reality, though, is that the nozzles feature a mechanism that can determine how full your gas tank is, shutting the flow of fuel off when necessary.

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How does it work? Well, YouTuber Steve Mould has taken the liberty of taking a gas pump nozzle and cutting it into a cross-section to show us how. So, the next time you ask a gas station attendant to make ‘sagad your fuel tank, pare,’ you know how it’s done.

We’re joking. Don’t talk to station attendants like that. Unless you want a full tank of diesel instead of gasoline.

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PHOTO: Steve Mould/YouTube
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