The Hyundai Accent’s PH pricing history

It has always been a value-for-money proposition
by TopGear.com.ph | Sep 18, 2018
PHOTO: Top Gear PH

Ever since its introduction, the Hyundai Accent has always been a value-for-money proposition. Its price has always been competitive. Here are the observations of the Top Gear PH staff through the years, in relation to the Accent's pricing.


2006

  • A well-maintained 2006 Accent unit typically commands resale values in the P400,000, if doesn’t need any repairs. Fixer-uppers will demand less, whereas mint-condition low-mileage units are rewarded with a small premium over the less stellar examples.
  • Taxi operators will quickly snatch up white units over any of the other colors. This is the first Accent that made its appearance here.

2011

  • At P588,000, the new Accent’s base 1.4-liter gasoline GL variant still undercuts its closest rival by P11,000 (and 100cc), ensuring a killing in fleet sales.
  • As with the Tucson, the release of the diesel is scheduled for a later date—it’s due to arrive in the middle of the year—but if Hyundai’s current crop of diesels are anything to go by, it shouldn’t disappoint.
  • There’s no shame at all in dedicating a model variant specifically to meet the demand for cheap, mass-order company cars. However, if a vehicle were to appeal to a wider buyer market, its higher variants must be spec’d to have a more upmarket feel. This is especially true for discerning/ discriminating B-segment bargain shoppers.
  • Hyundai wants to win over with this top-of-the-line Accent in 1.6-liter petrol GLS guise. The P806,000 asking price begs a very good answer to the question, “What more is there to it?”
  • Well, not bigger wheels—the GLS wears 14-inch alloys that can hardly be considered upgrades to the GL’s steel ones of the same diameter. Still, past the diminutive rollers and the yawning gaps they leave unfilled under the wheel arches, the exterior shares the classy styling cues of the new Hyundai models, its profile even having a Sonata vibe going on with sharply rendered creases. The strakes on the hood are the only pretense to performance, but otherwise, the front and the rear are modest-looking, doing away with unnecessary details on the sheet metal.

  • Buckling into the car for the first time, We found it a bit surprising that P218,000 worth of upgrades didn’t hit me as quick as a gunshot. Not that I’m playing devil’s advocate here, but I was hoping that the extra inch of wheel diameter the exterior was deprived of would be made up for by more toys in the cabin. Instead, most surfaces are hard and coarse plastic already showing some scars. The cursory knuckle test yielded hollow sounds that echoed throughout the cabin.


2013

  • The budget- and value-conscious buyer should consider the following: The Hyundai Accent Hatch CRDi is priced at P768,000 for the six-speed manual variant and P868,000 for the four-speed automatic. Both variants will deliver hybrid fuel economy.
  • Compared to Hyundai’s own 1,400cc Accent sedan, which is also available with either one of the two transmissions, the hatchback represents a P150,000 to P160,000 premium. Meanwhile, compared to the top-of-the-line 1,600cc automatic-transmission sedan, the diesel automatic hatchback costs only P40,000 more.
  • Here’s where it gets really interesting: Compare the prices to everything else in its class, and there’s nothing as affordable that can possibly deliver similar fuel efficiency, or is as fun and engaging to drive.
  • Those that come close in the fun-to-drive department, on the other hand, can hardly
    compete with the diesel Accent’s fuel economy. For their part, hybrids—even with a tax incentive (assuming the Alternative Fuel Vehicles Incentives Act gets signed into law)—will still cost significantly more.
  • I’m now left wondering how the Accent sedan might fare with a CRDi badge. Let’s hope Hyundai can make the wondering stop.
  • At just P768,000, the Accent CRDi is a grand bargain for lovers of speed. Unfortunately, the six-speed manual isn't a big advantage over the four-speed auto. The automatic has a better wheel-and-tire package, drives smoother and gets the same cruising economy. And with the torque of the diesel, you won't miss those two extra intermediate gears all that much.

2014

  • We told you about the newly arrived face-lifted Hyundai models: the Elantra, the Tucson and the Accent. Together with those cosmetically revised models was one other new offering: a diesel-powered Accent sedan. Unfortunately, while we were able to provide you with the official prices for the face-lifted models, we weren't able to do so for the diesel Accent sedan as it wasn't available yet.

  • Well, good news: Hyundai Asia Resources Inc. has finally shared with us the final selling price for the Accent 1.6E CRDi Diesel MT sedan, and it's P728,000. That's significantly lower than the company's asking price for the Accent CRDi Diesel MT hatchback, which is P808,000.

 

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