These images show the severity of the ashfall from Taal Volcano’s eruption

Harmless? It’s anything but
by Drei Laurel | Jan 14, 2020
PHOTO: Lian Hammer Dumas

From behind the screen of a smartphone, the ashfall that’s resulted from Taal Volcano’s eruption might seem harmless—just a thick mist of dust and dirt piling onto cars and rooftops here in Metro Manila.

Harmless? It’s anything but.

There’s a reason the Department of Health (DOH) and other government services are warning the public to take caution when dealing with the stuff, recommending the use of N95 face masks and even protective eyewear if possible. On a microscopic level, ashfall can damage your lungs and irritate eyes, and its sheer weight can cause some structures to collapse. This is serious.

Now, just imagine what areas closer to the actual crater are dealing with. You know what? Scratch that. Since you’re on your smartphone already, just take a look at some of the images of the ashfall’s immediate aftermath circulating online:

Continue reading below ↓
Continue reading below ↓
Recommended Videos

Continue reading below ↓

Continue reading below ↓

Continue reading below ↓

Continue reading below ↓

As we said, this is serious stuff. In case you or anyone you know is in an emergency situation, here’s a list of government emergency services you can contact:

  1. National Disaster Risk Reduction And Management Council (NDRRMC) – (02) 8911-5061 to 65 local 100
  2. Philippine National Police (PNP) – 117 or (02) 8722-0650
  3. Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP) – (02) 8426-0219 or (02) 8426-0246
  4. Philippine Red Cross – 143 or (02) 8527-8385 to 95
  5. Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) – (02) 8426-1468 to 79
  6. Bureau of Fire Protection (BFP) – (02) 8426-0219 or (02) 8426-0246
Continue reading below ↓

See Also

PHOTO: Lian Hammer Dumas
  • Quiz Results

  • TGP Rating:
    /20

    Starts at ₱

    TGP Rating:
    /20
    Starts at ₱