Should you manually rev your engine to prevent battery discharge?

Work-from-home folks, take note
by Leandre Grecia | Apr 6, 2020
Should you manually rev your engine to prevent battery discharge?
PHOTO: Shutterstock

Have you been driving your car enough lately? If you’re among the lucky ones who can still work from home as the rest of the world emerges into a post-COVID reality, the answer is probably no.

That means if you have a daily driver in your garage, it could be prone to some issues already—battery discharge, first and foremost.

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If you haven’t fired up your car in a while, then your battery may well be in need of a charge. If you do regularly start up its engine, then you’re okay. That said, regardless of the case, there’s still a question that some people have been asking around these days: Whenever I start up my car, should I rev the engine to prevent battery discharge? Well, the answer is both yes and no.

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If you’re merely starting up your car without any of its accessories on just to charge the battery, then you’re fine leaving it alone as it is. In terms of just the car battery and discharge, you don’t have to do the revving part. But if you’re using your car to jump-start another vehicle, it’s best you rev your car’s engine as you try to fire up the other.

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Should you manually rev your engine to prevent battery discharge?

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Also, if you want to increase oil pressure to let lubricants in your car’s system circulate better, then revving can do the trick. While you’re at it, why not drive the car around if you can? Even just some forward and reverse movements along the driveway can help, just to circulate transmission and differential fluids, as well as to avoid flat spots on your tires.

Now, we hope this clears things up. But if you still need more maintenance tips for cars stuck in your garage, then you’re probably talking about long-term car storage already. Good thing we already made a tip sheet on that, which you can check out here. Also, if you have a few more tips to add to that list or to this article, share them in the comments section.

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PHOTO: Shutterstock
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